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20130118
20130118
Search Results 0 to 5 of about 6 (some duplicates have been removed)
expect from their nato ally. the need to say the european nations can't pay ransom money to terrorist groups because that simply fuels them to buy arms and soldiers. >> michael: but is nato looking to the united states richard to be the nation that says okay you guys listen up what happened with germany and france they paid these ransoms and got these 18 people out, and now they have funded these groups? why is it incumbent upon the united states then to be -- you know -- [ overlapping speakers ] >> the united states pays more than two-thirds of the nato budget so we have a lion's share of influence. the money paid to save the germans and french backpackers, that trend has continued. now we have encouraged -- our allies have encouraged this industry by rewarding it with money, and instead of reacting -- using other means. >> michael: of course it is going to continue if it has worked. i want to ask you as someone who has a degree of expertise in this, where do you see this going now? and what would america's role be? on the ground, with drones? what is your tak
to fight rebels in mali. eu foreign ministers in brussels for talks there. nato approved a mission to send 200 military trainers to help mali's forces. >> and they are considering other ways to help the government. the first troops from the african-led mission are due to arrive today. >> for more, we are joined by our brussels correspondent. the eu has agreed to send military personnel. do we have any idea what this mission will look like? >> it is important to stress first of all that the idea is not new. back in december, they agreed they saw the situation and said they would send down a couple of hundred instructors -- of around 200 instructors -- to train the army, and now, of course, in light of recent developments, this mission will be sped up, which means 200 instructors or 250 will be sent down. they will instruct the army in terms of basic military training, but also in the field of international and humanitarian law and how to protect civilians. there are not many details yet in the number -- and the number of people deployed to the ground could rise again. all we know is that th
. >> suarez: you've got a nato partner in france fighting against a guerrilla army in mali. it's not an easy task, is it? >> not at all. from a logistical standpoint i thought the itn reporter was spot on when she talked about the logistical issues that are inherent in any kind of war, but they are particularly in hernt in one where the climate is difficult, where the terrain is almost impossible and where you're really not used to configureing your forces in a way that allows you to move rapidly in this kind of terrain. it's very much adown the american southwest and it is a very, very difficult area not only from the standpoint of things like temperature and mountains and things of that nature, it's the nature of the terrain that makes it very difficult to move from one point to another. >> suarez: we've been covering the fight in mali over the last several days but algeria hasn't been in the news for a long time. what's the state of play there? who's running the place? >> there's a government in algeria, it's one that probably we would describe as formerly a republic but an authoritarian
Search Results 0 to 5 of about 6 (some duplicates have been removed)